California Work Schedule Laws

California Work Schedule Laws

The Golden State is known for having progressive labor regulations designed to protect employees’ rights and welfare. Among these are California work schedule laws, which regulate working hours, job schedules, and how employers create them. These laws offer essential employee protections, as they help guarantee predictable schedules and safeguard employee pay when unexpected changes happen. This article will look at key aspects of California work schedule laws, including how many days an employee can work in a row, overtime regulations, and whether employers can change work schedules on short notice. Contact us today to speak with a California employment lawyer!

How Many Days Do Employee Work Schedule Laws Allow Employees to Work in a Row?

An important employee concern is how many days an employer can schedule an employee to work in a row. According to California Law, employees generally get one day of rest for every seven that they work. This means that, in most cases, an employer cannot schedule an employee to work more than six days without a day off. However, this rule doesn’t apply if an employee works less than 30 hours a week or doesn’t work more than six hours on any day of the week. There are also exceptions to this rule. For example, California allows employees in specific industries, such as agriculture and healthcare, to work more than six consecutive days under certain circumstances.

What Are Overtime Job Schedule Laws in California?

Overtime is another crucial part of job schedule laws in California. Overtime regulations ensure employers compensate employees fairly for extra work hours above a certain number of hours. California directs employers to pay employees overtime for the following:

  • Non-exempt employees receive overtime pay at 1.5 times their regular rate if they work more than 8 hours in a day or more than 40 hours in a week;
  • Non-exempt employees who work more than 12 hours in a single day get double their regular rate for hours worked beyond the 12-hour mark;
  • For non-exempt employees who work 7 days in a row, employers pay the first 8 hours at 1.5 times the regular rate, and any hours worked beyond that double the rate.

Failure to comply with these overtime laws can result in serious financial penalties for employers. If you believe your employer is violating work schedule laws, a skilled advocate at Bibiyan Law Group can assist you. We can review your case, offer professional, top-notch guidance, and help protect your rights.

What Are the Laws About Short Notice Work Schedule Changes?

Many California cities have individual rules and regulations about how and when to schedule employees, including provisions for accommodating an employee’s preferred hours and days, among other considerations. Since life is unpredictable and employers sometimes need to make last-minute scheduling alterations, these rules also cover the “hows” of rescheduling when making these changes.

Under California law, employers in specific industries, such as retail and food service, must provide employees with a schedule at least seven days in advance. And they must give employees 72-hour notice before changing an employee’s schedule. If the employer fails to do this and calls in an employee for a previously unscheduled shift, the employee may be entitled to additional compensation. Other cities, such as San Francisco, have enacted “predictive scheduling” laws requiring certain employers to provide two weeks’ notice of work schedules and to pay for shift changes. 

Depending on where in California you live, scheduling laws vary, so it’s always a good idea to speak with an employment lawyer if you have concerns. At Bibiyan Law Group, we can help you understand your city’s local scheduling laws and ensure your employer treats you fairly.

What Are the Consequences for Violating Work Schedule Laws?

Employers who fail to follow California’s work schedule laws face stiff penalties. These penalties can include paying back wages, overtime, and additional penalties for each violation. If you believe your employer violated work schedule laws, one option is to file a claim with the Division of Labor Standards Enforcement (DLSE) of the California Department of Industrial Relations. The DLSE will investigate your claim and determine whether to impose penalties. It is also a good idea to consult with a skilled employment lawyer. At Bibiyan Law Group, our compassionate attorneys can review your case, help you file a claim, and hold your employer accountable.

Call Bibiyan Law Group, PC Today

If you have work schedule questions, Bibiyan Law Group can help. We only practice employment law and have honed our knowledge to offer candid, compassionate, and hard-hitting representation. We back our words with actions and have secured tens of millions of dollars in client settlements for employees like you. You are not alone in this fight. Together with our team of nearly 20 skilled attorneys, we can evaluate the problem and help you seek justice. Schedule a complimentary consultation now and let Bibiyan Law Group give your case the personalized attention it deserves.

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David Bibiyan is a distinguished attorney at Tomorrow Law, renowned for his expertise in employment law. With a strong focus on representing employees in various workplace disputes, he has become a trusted advocate for those facing discrimination, harassment, wrongful termination, and wage and hour issues. Bibiyan’s approach is characterized by a deep understanding of both state and federal employment laws, ensuring that his clients receive knowledgeable and effective representation. His commitment to justice is evident in his dedication to each case, where he meticulously works to secure the best possible outcomes for his clients. Bibiyan’s reputation is built on a foundation of successful case resolutions, marked by his skillful negotiation and, when necessary, aggressive litigation strategies. His work at Tomorrow Law reflects a genuine passion for defending workers’ rights and promoting fair employment practices.

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